Moss Piglet is a newsletter about learning how to be myself after a lifetime of trying to be any other person.

Moss Piglet was a featured Substack publication this year.

Growing up, I found the social side of life really difficult. I turned to alcohol to help, but that became its own problem. At 33 I got sober, and at 37 I discovered I was autistic. I also have inattentive ADD.

🙌😎🤯🥳🐒

Which kinda explained the struggle for all those years.

This newsletter is about how to accept yourself, trauma, disability, gifts and all. Moss Piglet contains 4 sections, currently:

Beautiful Hangover about learning to live and love sober.

Polite Robot about getting a late diagnosis of autism.

When the Earth Could Breathe, a novel in instalments.

The name Moss Piglet stems from the humble (and microscopic) but crucial tardigrade, who we can all learn from. Over the coming months I hope to bring more of my thoughts about rewilding, permaculture and the climate crisis into the mix, too.

Subscribe if you want more acceptance and joy and fun, and to let go of perfectionism and codependency and self sabotage.

Also, if you like silly drawings.

Idea for new merch.

I will send you a new post every Tuesday! (Apart from when I can't because I need to lie down and can't do anything. #autisticburnoutisreal)

And you can join a community of like-minded people, as well as accessing the archives.

Yeah, but who am I?

I’m an award-winning YA novelist and a senior lecturer in Creative Writing at UWE. Here’s a rave review of my first book, Infinite Sky, in the Guardian.

I’m working on a new book about getting sober and how plants and animals helped me heal, as well as a new YA book about time travel in a forest.

🌿🌌🌲🍃🪺🪐🌱🌳🤷🪐🧭🖲️🔦⛑️📡⌛🌿🌲🌳🍃🪺🌠⏳🕰️🌿🌲


Oh, and if you find you enjoy my writing and believe writers deserve to be paid, then consider taking out a subscription.

Thanks for reading, and let me know if there’s anything you want me to cover. <3

Chelsey x

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Most popular post: Why I Paid £700 for a Diagnosis Though Nobody Believes I Am Autistic